Penang Attractions Faqs

David asks…

what to do in penang for 1 day?

Hey people.

I will be travelling to Penang Malaysia for a 1 day stopover,

Anybody could suggest me an itinerary from early morning like 8am till evening?

Prefer shopping and food over attractions….however any suggestions is welcome.

Thank you very much

Penang Local Boy answers:

Eat local food like laksa, nasi kandar, char kway teow etc.
Try local dessert like cendol for tea break.
Dinner eat seafood.

Shopping head to Queensbay , the largest in Penang.

For snacks/souvenirs, head to the shops selling things like tau sar peah. Delicious and famous in Penang!

Carol asks…

Visit Penang?

worth to visit Penang, any good tourist attraction?

Penang Local Boy answers:

God, if you’re there, please have mercy on us? Thank you.

Richard asks…

I will be passing through Penang for 3 days. What should I know about Malaysia and its culture?

I will be in Penang for three days – passing through to Thailand. This is my first time in Malaysia. What should I know about Malaysian culture and customs that will help make my stay more pleasant ? What are social etiquette, appropriate behavior in a way so not to offend the locals, acceptable attire, local customs that I should know about.

(I don’t need to know about climate as I have been to Thailand many times and I am not asking for a list of tourist attractions or what to do as most of the itinerary has been taken care of)

Penang Local Boy answers:

Malaysian has Muslims so its best to wear covered clothing especially during this month which is Ramadhan (muslim fasting month). Lots of food shop will be closed in the morning but you can eat at Chinese or Indian food shop. So its better if you don’t eat in public to respect the locals.
Penang has lots of Chinese ethnic so you have nothing to worry about cause they quiet open minded.
Malaysian is multi-cultural country so each culture have their own traditions. So whatever you do just respect each culture and their traditions.Hope you enjoy your stay in Penang!

Sharon asks…

I will be passing through Penang for 3 days. What should I know about Malaysia, its customs and culture?

In two weeks, I will be in Penang for three days – passing through to Thailand. This is my first time in Malaysia ( been to Thailand many times). What should I know about Malaysian culture and customs that will help make my stay more pleasant ? What are social etiquette, appropriate behaviour in a way so not to offend the locals, acceptable attire, local customs that I should know about.

I am not asking for a list of tourist attractions – my travelling companions already have places we are visiting. I know about the weather – been to Thailand many times. Just want to know any specific customs and any specific way to behave that I should know as a foreigner – say, as different to Thailand.

Penang Local Boy answers:

Malaysia consists of two distinct geographical regions: Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia. National language of the country is Malay, it is English that is widely spoken and understood by the people in the country.

The traditional Malay greeting or salam resembles a handshake, but with both hands outstretched and without the grasp. The man offers both hands, lightly touches his friend’s hands, then brings his hands back to his chest to mean, “I greet you from my heart”. The visitor should reciprocate the salam.

Social visits: Before visiting a home, it is polite to call and inform of one’s arrival. Shoes must always be removed when entering a Malaysian home. Drinks are generally offered to guests. It would be polite to accept.

Gestures: The right hand is always used when eating with one’s fingers or when giving and receiving objects. The right forefinger is not used to point at places, objects or persons. Instead, the thumb of the right hand with the four fingers folded under is the preferred usage.

Conduct: Public behaviour is especially important in Malaysian culture. Most Malaysians refrain from displaying affection (i.e. Embracing or kissing) in public. It would be appropriate for visitors to do the same.

Food and beverage: Muslims consume halal food (permissible by Muslim law) and only dine in restaurants which are certified halal. Pork and alcohol are not consumed by Muslims. Hindus do not consume beef.

Dressing: A majority of Muslim women wear garments that fully cover their bodies. The usage of headscarves is also common. Visitors are encouraged to take note of local sensitivities and dress modestly.

Places of worship: Shoes must be removed when entering places of worship such as mosque and temples. Some mosque provide robes and scarves for female visitors. Taking photographs at places of worship is usually permitted but request for permission first.

Most hotels and restaurants levy a 10% service charge and 5% government sales tax on bills. Therefore, tipping is not customary. However, should you want to show your appreciation for good service, a small tip will do.

All purchases are done in Malaysian Ringgit (RM). Major credit cards are accepted in most dining and retail outlets.

Hypermarkets, supermarkets and most retail outlets have fixed prices for their goods, which are displayed on the products. However, bargaining is acceptable at selected retail outlets. Bargaining is most common at night markets (‘pasar malam’), or at bazaars.

Shopping centres operate from 10:00am to 10:00pm with extended hours during sale and festive seasons.

Dining: Most eateries operate until late night. Selected eateries are open 24 hours. Some Malaysians enjoy their meals using their fingers. Adventurous visitors can try savouring their meals with their fingers too. Otherwise, it is perfectly normal to request for cutlery.

Mealtimes in Malay villages or ‘kampungs’ will be especially interesting. Villagefolk prefer to enjoy their meals while seated on a mat spread on the floor. Here too, families eat using their fingers. Before the meal, hands are washed using a ‘kendi’, a container resembling a teapot.

During feasts or ‘kenduri’, the host and other locals will say their prayers before beginning their meal. As a close-knit society, villagers will also invite guests for second or third helpings in a warm and friendly manner. Visitors can politely decline if they do not wish to.

General information
Currency: The Malaysian currency is normally referred to as Ringgit or RM. The RM comes in denominations of RM1, RM2, RM5, RM10, RM50 and RM100. Coins are known as sen. These include 1 sen, 5 sen, 10 sen, 20 sen, and 50 sen. Foreign currencies can be changed at banks, airports and money changers.

Safety: Malaysia is relatively safe country. However, visitors are advised to take certain precautionary measures to ensure their safety. Safeguard your valuables at all times. Strap or sling your bags when on the move and walk against oncoming traffic. Keep your handbags and wallets safe and close to you especially when in crowded areas. Avoid entering dark and quiet alleys.

Read on for more useful tips:
Travel formalities: http://bit.ly/iX1WPa
Word commonly used: http://bit.ly/jqZpVN

Joseph asks…

Budget or Service Apartment to Rent in Kuala Lumpur And Penang for tourist .. Details Inside?

I em visiting Malaysia in the 3rd week of July with my family . I was hoping to find some affordable apartments to rent in kuala lumpur and Penang .
I will be staying in kuala lumpur for 4 days and Penang for 3 Days
i want a 2 bedroom apartment that can accommodate 5 Adults
My uncle visited Malaysia 5 yrz back and he said that rental apartment are the best accommodation as they are both affordable and convenient
can you please suggest some apartments that are located near the tourist attractions and bus station or other form of transport. I herd KLCC is the best place to stay in kuala lumpur .
Can you please provide the Link as well so i can check it out myself

Much facilities are not needed
but rooms and bathroom should be clean and the area should be secure as i am visiting with my family.

Penang Local Boy answers:

There’s SuCasa Service Apartment in Jalan Ampang, close to KLCC. Here’s the website:-http://www.malaysiayellowpages.net/sucasa/

Also, you can try The Zon (http://www.zonhotel.com.my/). Much closer to KLCC.

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